James Protz | Dealey Plaza, Dallas

Dealey Plaza, Dallas

November 22, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

Back in July 2005 I went to Dallas Texas for a combined vacation and a bit of continuing education.  As a side trip, I visited Dealey Plaza, where John F. Kennedy was assassinated.  With all of the news, documentary footage and stories of the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination, I thought it would be a good time to look back on the trip that I took there 8 years ago and the pictures that I took at the time.

First stop was Reunion Tower.  Similar in size to the Calgary Tower, one can walk around the entire perimeter of the tower and get a pretty good view of Dallas.  This is the downtown area of Dallas.

 

 Dealey Plaza, as seen from the top of Reunion Tower.

 

Dealey Plaza, from the top of Reunion Tower, a wider view.

 

Looking towards the 'grassy knoll'.

 

The Dealey Plaza 'pergola'.

 

Looking at Elm Street.  See the red 'X' on the street?  This is where the first shot hit Kennedy.

 

Looking at the 'grassy knoll' and the Pergola.

 

Another view of Elm Street, and the 'X' marking the fatal shot.

 

Driving on Elm Street today is a hazard.  There are plenty of tourists who walk out to the middle of the street to stand on the exact spot of the fatal shot. 

 

Standing by the grassy knoll.  The City of Dallas has made a great deal of effort to retain the history of this site.  This fence is kept the same way it was back in 1963.

 

Looking up along Elm Street.

 

Another view of Elm Street Showing the location of one of the shots.

 

The plaque at the side of Elm Street. 

 

It was almost surreal to walk around the site of one of history's most famous murders.  That little red 'X' contained a whole lot of history, and emotion for a lot of people.

 

Standing behind the grassy knoll.  If there was a second gunman as many believe, this is the exact spot that he would have been standing.  Before I made this trip 8 years ago, I always believed that there was a second gunman who probably shot Kennedy.  But after visiting the site in person, I came away with mixed feelings.  There were two things that really made me think.  First, the Dealey Plaza site is much smaller in person than what one sees on TV.  Second, the view from this spot on the grassy knoll is perfect.  It is the ideal spot to take a shot at an oncoming car.  But given the amount of people that were along this street on Nov. 22, 1963, how could no one have seen someone standing behind this fence with a gun? 

 

Graffiti on the fence behind the grassy knoll.

 

More graffiti.  This place is like a shrine to a lot of people. 

 

More graffiti on the fence. 

 

Another look at the knoll.  Assuming that someone did take a shot from this spot, there isn't much of a path for a getaway behind here.  It's another one of the things that started to make me question the 'grassy knoll gunman' theory.

 

The plaque on the side of the Texas Schoolbook Depository.

 

Looking up towards the 6th floor, where Lee Harvey Oswald would have been.

 

Looking down towards the triple underpass.  Kennedy's motorcade took off through this tunnel after the fatal shots.

 

Looking up at the grassy knoll.  If you look right near the corner of the fence, you can see some tourists standing where the alleged second gunman would have been.  It's not obvious from this picture, but I could definitely see people there, they were not hidden.  It's another reason why I find it hard to believe that no one saw someone standing there with a gun and firing.

 

Near the pergola.  Abraham Zapruder would have been here, taking the 8mm movie of the assassination that everyone is familiar with.

 

 

 

 

The School Book Depository, looking at the sixth floor.  There is now a museum on the sixth floor, which unfortunately, one cannot take pictures of.  It is a very interesting place to see though.  At the top right window where Oswald would have been, it is now plexi-glassed off and recreated to look exactly as it did on November 22, 1963. 

 

The memorial plaques next to Elm Street.

 

Dealey Plaza is named after George Bannerman Dealey, a publisher of the Dallas news. 

 

One final look at Elm Street.

 


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